sábado, 22 de outubro de 2016

THE ROLLING STONES 1ST UK ALBUM

Original released on LP Decca LK 4605 (mono)
(UK 1964, April 16)






The Rolling Stones is as pivotal a moment as John meeting Paul or Nirvana knocking Michael Jackson off No. 1. Jagger, Richard (as he was credited then), and co. weren’t strangers to the studio when they began their debut in January 1964. They’d already scored hits in 1963 with Chuck Berry’s “Come On” and Lennon and McCartney’s “I Wanna Be Your Man”. Confident songwriters, however, they were not. Judging initial efforts unsuitable for the Stones, Jagger and Richard gave them to Marianne Faithfull and Gene Pitney. Of the album’s originals, “Now I’ve Got A Witness” and “Little By Little” (credited to the collective nom de plume Nanker Phelge) are indebted to, respectively Marvin Gaye’s “Can I Get A Witness” and Jimmy Reed’s “Shame, Shame, Shame,” while “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)” (presented here in both versions*) is almost a Merseybeat pastiche. But relying on covers did not do Sinatra or Elvis any harm, and the Stones established a reliable template: take a blues tune; make it harder and faster and scarier. In The Beatles’ wake, the result was a smash. In America, London Records added “England’s Newest Hit Makers” to a sleeve that, in Britain, boldly bore no information bar the label’s logo. London also replaced Bo Diddley’s “I Need You Baby (Mona)” with a hit take on Buddy Holly’sw “Not Fade Away”. The Rolling Stones is not as good as material they would release in ensuing years – or even months. But its arrogant raunchiness had a seismic impact on polite pop then – and continues to echo today.



*NOTE: Early pressings of the UK release of the debut album mistakenly included the piano-less version of "Tell Me" (the 2:52 version); all subsequent releases have featured the version with piano. The full-length (4:06) recording of this piano version, which appeared on the standard UK LP after the mistake was corrected, has an abrupt ending before the performance of the song finishes. Most other LP and CD versions of the UK debut album — as well as the Stones' debut US album, originally subtitled but later officially called "England's Newest Hit Makers" — contain an edited version of this recording, which fades out at around 3:48. In June 1964 "Tell Me" was released as a single in the USA only. The single edit is 2:47. It peaked at # 24 for two weeks, and lasting in the Billboard Hot 100 for a total of 10 weeks. The B-side was a cover of the Willie Dixon song "I Just Wanna Make Love to You". The "Tell Me" single was re-released on various Rolling Stones compilation albums, including "Big Hits (High Tide and Green Grass)", "More Hot Rocks (Big Hits & Fazed Cookies)", "30 Greatest Hits", and "Singles Collection: The London Years". Over the years, the 3:48 edit has replaced the 2:47 single edit on such compilations; for example, the 1989 edition of "Singles Collection: The London Years" has the single edit, while the 2002 edition has the longer version.


4 comentários:

Pedro disse...

"Garoto" tu és FANTASTICO, nos discos que nos colaca a disposição, e o melhor, não fica chorando para que deixamos mensagens. Quem sabe o que faz e faz bem feito tem o reconhecimento natural, não precisa pedir elogios.

Kaserio disse...

Link forbiden !
Tant pis
K

Rato disse...

No more... for the moment...

Georgie Hirezola disse...

great choice the DECCA LP...thnx

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...